Jaroslav Horejc (1886 – 1983) was a Czech sculptor and designer. He was born in Prague.

Education

He studied at the Specialized School of Jewelry and, 1906-10, School of Applied Arts, both in Prague. 

Livia, bronze, green patina, signed Horejc, height 18 cm, a black marble stand (Zí)
Livia, bronze, green patina, signed Horejc, height 18 cm, a black marble stand (Zí)

Biography

From 1912, he collaborated with the cooperative Artel and designed Cubist ceramic vases.  

Between 1918-48, he was a metal-work professor at, School of Applied Arts, Prague. He designed metal latticework and screens with architect Jan Kotera and others. He designed important work in glass, including the four famous cut and engraved pieces, 1921 Bacchus, 1922-23 Canaan, 1923 Dance, and 1924 Three Goddesses. These carved figures combined the past with the modern world. He designed unique jewellery in the Art Deco style and a 1937 cut-glass monumental relief The Earth and the Men for the Palace of Nations, Geneva.

Jaroslav Horejc, Pallas Athena, Painted, carved and gilt wood.
Jaroslav Horejc, Pallas Athena, Painted, carved and gilt wood.

From 1922 he worked at the Stephen Rath Glassworks.

Jaroslav Horejc (1886 Prague 1983), A Bacchus vase “Dance”, designed c. 1925
Jaroslav Horejc (1886 Prague 1983), A Bacchus vase “Dance”, designed c. 1925
Clear Glass tumbler designed by Jaroslav Horejc
Clear Glass tumbler designed by Jaroslav Horejc

Recognition

He received grand prize (for cut glass collection) at 1925 Paris ‘Exposition International des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes.’

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

Newman, H. (1987). An Illustrated Dictionary of Glass: 2,442 entries, including definitions of wares, materials, processes, forms, and decorative styles, and entries on principal glass-makers, decorators, and designers, from antiquity to the present. Thames and Hudson.

Sandon, J. (2003). Antique glass. Antique Collectors’ Club.

Wood, G. (2003). Essential Art Deco. Bulfinch Press.

Czech Cubism (1910 – 1925) economical design and strictly aesthetic – Encyclopedia of Design

Czech cubism influenced by the forms of contemporary cubist painting seen in Prague’s galleries and salons at the beginning of the 20th century. Czech Cubism embraced architecture, design and decorative arts and flourished most prolifically in the years immediately preceding and following the outbreak of the First World War.

Frantíšek Kysela (1881 – 1941) Czech designer and teacher – Encyclopedia of Design

Frantíšek Kysela (1881 – 1941) was a Czech designer and teacher. He was born in Kourim. Between 1900-04 and 1905-08, he studied at the School of Decorative Arts Prague, under K. Mašek. 1904-05, he attended the Academy of Fine Arts, Prague: under H. Schwaigr. In 1913, he became a professor, School of Decorative Arts, Prague.

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