Carl J. Jucker (1902 – 1997) Swiss metalworker

Carl J.Jucker (1902 – 1997) was a metal worker from Switzerland.

Education

He studied at the Kunstgewerbeschule, Zürich, from 1918-1922. He studied under Muche between 1922 and 1923. He studied at Bauhaus with Christian Dell, Paul Klee and László Moholy-Nagy.

Metal and glass table lamp with opaline shade by Wilhelm Wagenfeld and Jakob Jucker, 1923-24
Metal and glass table lamp with opaline shade by Wilhelm Wagenfeld and Jakob Jucker, 1923-24

Biography

Many of his lamp models were made for the Haus am Horn interior of 1923, of which the Glaslampe was the most well-known. This model was perfected by Wilhelm Wagenfeld for serial production at the Bauhaus by Jucker. With Marcel Breuer, Jucker collaborated on the production of tubular steel furniture. He returned to Switzerland in 1923 and became a designer at Jetzler’s silverware factory in Schaffhausen. He taught in Zürich and Schaffhausen and was a member of the Lacustre yacht design team.

Bauhaus Desk Light by Carl J. Jucker, Germany 1923
Bauhaus Desk Light by Carl J. Jucker, Germany 1923

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

Wagenfeld, W., & Jucker, C. J. Wilhelm Wagenfeld, Carl Jakob Jucker. Table Lamp. 1923-24: MoMA. The Museum of Modern Art. https://www.moma.org/collection/works/4056.

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