Porcelain Bowls Made with Balloons

Guy Van Leemput, a porcelain artist and mathematician, crafts exquisite ceramic bowls using air filled balloons. He achieves precisely round vases, gracefully finished with detailed parts to produce insolite and delicate design pieces, by allowing the material to flow on the balloon.

Source: Porcelain Bowls Made with Balloons

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