Phlox collection of furniture from Okamura

The core of this collection of collaboration seats and tables is nature, which invites colleagues to connect in comfort and ease. Curved forms will lighten the work environment and encourage a flow of creative energy. Spill out into natural break-out areas, where easy and natural encounters will ensue. The night phlox flower’s smell and attractive petals inspired the collection, reflecting both nature’s vibrancy and calming effect. The Phlox Collection was created with circularity in mind, assuring a low environmental impact.

Natural interactions across a range of settings

With a welcome selection of settings, you may naturally inspire creativity and establish trust. Comfortably envelop yourself in rounded seats with fluid lines and a soft, supportive, cushioned inner shell. To set the tone for collaboration, choose one of three seat heights. With straightforward adjustments, conference chairs provide mid- or high-back support. Settle into a serious debate in Phlox lounge chairs or meet spontaneously in high stool chairs that easily connect the team.

Drawn together naturally

Bring life to your room by providing a varied landscape of low tables, conferencing tables, and high tables. Combine four distinct heights with six gently curved tabletops in various shapes and sizes, as well as a variety of natural finishes. Due to its design, a huge pentagonal table, which can comfortably seat six people, can also be used by a small group of two or three people. Bring people together in groups, and ideas will start to flow.

Designed by Rainlight

Rainlight, a product design agency with headquarters in London and New York with client partnerships worldwide, collaborated on the Phlox Collection. Rainlight is a lab, a workshop, and a studio that blends imaginative design thinking with business savvy to develop artefacts that improve people’s lives, work, and play in the real world. Rainlight’s cross-cultural and inter-disciplinary research practice enables them to unearth the demands of a changing society.

Soften the office

Phlox’s delicate curves and fluidity soften a space while promoting flow and movement. People will be drawn in by the elegant lines and soft edges to connect, settle, and unwind. Two-tone upholstery adds tactile and visual interest to the room. For the inside shell, choose from eight carefully picked hues, and for the outer shell, choose from grey or dark grey.

Details that inspire

The tapered knife-edge motif on the tabletops is both elegant and tactile. With a variety of textures and finishes, excite the senses to promote wellbeing. Choose from a curated range of colour options for your wood veneer, laminate, or linoleum worktop, which may be tastefully matched with legs in one of four woodgrain finishes.

Source

Phlox: Products. Okamura. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2021, from https://www.okamura.com/en_us/products/categories/seating/multi_purpose/phlox/.

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