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Limousin, French Art Deco Egyptian Dancer C.1920-30

An intriguing facet of French Art Deco, a style prevalent in the 1920s and 1930s, is its incorporation of exotic and international elements. This era saw French designers draw inspiration from far-flung cultures, notably Egyptian, African, and Asian art. This global influence was partly spurred by the 1925 Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, where many nations showcased their art and designs.

One iconic example is the use of Egyptian motifs, a trend that surged after the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922. This led to the incorporation of hieroglyphics, sphinxes, and lotus motifs in various decorative arts, including furniture, textiles, and jewellery.

Did You Know? The term ‘Art Deco’ itself comes from the name of the 1925 Paris Exposition, though it only became widely used in the 1960s.

Engaging Thought: How do you think the incorporation of diverse cultural elements in Art Deco impacted the evolution of design? Delve deeper into the cross-cultural influences in design history on Encyclopedia Design.

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