Pierre Vágó (1910 – 2002) Hungarian Architect and Designer

Pierre Vago Sketch featured image
Pierre Vago Sketch featured image

Pierre Vago (1910 – 2002) was a Hungarian Architect and designer. He studied at the École Spéciale d’Architecture, Paris. 

Because of his housing projects, factories, and the Central Banks of the French colonies of Tunisia and Algeria, as well as his controversial Basilica of St. Pius X in Lourdes, he received much attention in the postwar years. In 1957, he designed one of the new residential buildings in Berlin’s Hansaviertel.

He settled in France in 1928, where he was editor-in-chief on three issues of the review L’Architecture d’aujourd’hui.  After World War 2, he was active in reviving the journal and set up his architecture office. In 1948 he left the journal, and it was in 1948 that he became a member of UAM (Union des Artistes Modernes). He built the Basicila de Saint-Pi X (with architect Pierre Pinsard and engineer Eugéne Freysinnet) in Lourdes.

His 1934 dining room with aluminium furniture in his all-metal house was installed at the 1935 Paris Salon d’Habitation.

Pierre Vago was also an honorary member of the Royal Institute of British Architects, the German Bund Deutscher Architekten, and the American Institute of Architects.

A selection of his works

Apartment building in Berlin designed by Pierre Vago
Apartment building in Berlin designed by Pierre Vago

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

Advertisements

More Hungarian Designers

  • Chaise Lounge by Marcel Breuer

    Chaise Lounge by Marcel Breuer

    Marcel Breuer designed this chaise lounge during his influential period in England (1935-37). His work for the London-based design and architectural firm Isokon is the most recognizable of this period. The chaise was designed for the 1936 Seven Architects Exhibition for Heal & Sons Department Store.Read More →

  • Pierre Vágó (1910 – 2002) Hungarian Architect and Designer

    Pierre Vágó (1910 – 2002) Hungarian Architect and Designer

    Pierre Vago was a Hungarian Architect and designer. He studied at the École Spéciale d’Architecture, Paris. He settled in France in 1928, where he was editor-in-chief on three issues of the review L’Architecture d’aujourd’hui. After World War 2, he was active in reviving the journal and set up his architecture office. In 1948 he left the journal, and it was in 1948 that he became a member of UAM (Union des Artistes Modernes). He built the Basicila de Saint-Pi X (with architect Pierre Pinsard and engineer Eugéne Freysinnet) in Lourdes.Read More →

  • Gustave Miklos (1888 – 1967) Hungarian designer, sculptor and artist

    Gustave Miklos (1888 – 1967) Hungarian designer, sculptor and artist

    In the French army during World War I, he discovered the art of Greece and Byzantium. In Paris after the war, he met Jacques Doucet, for whom he designed silverware, enamels, tapestries and carpets for the residence on the avenue du Bois (today avenue Foch). In c1923 he turned to sculpture and completed commissions for Doucet and others in a Cubist style.Read More →

  • Marcel Breuer (1902 – 1981) Hungarian architect and industrial designer

    Marcel Breuer (1902 – 1981) Hungarian architect and industrial designer

    He attended the Vienna Akademie der bildenden Künste in 1920 and the Bauhaus in Weimar from 1920 to 1924. In 1920, he moved to Vienna, intending to become a painter and sculptor. However, he left the Akademie der bildenden Kunste because he was displeased with it, and he enrolled at the Bauhaus in Weimar, where he became one of its most well-known students. Read More →

  • Paul Kiss (1885 – 1962) Hungarian Metal worker

    Paul Kiss (1885 – 1962) Hungarian Metal worker

    Paul Kiss was Hungarian metalworker he was born Belabalva (now Romania). He was professionally active in Paris. Read More →

  • THE NEW BAUHAUS: The Legacy Of László Moholy-Nagy — Film Inquiry

    THE NEW BAUHAUS: The Legacy Of László Moholy-Nagy — Film Inquiry

    The revolutionary German art school known as the Bauhaus (1919-1933) was unique for its time in the way its curriculum combined the applied and fine arts, teaching students to create works that could satisfy both form and function. Read More →

  • Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (1895 – 1946) Hungarian Designer – Applied Arts

    Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (1895 – 1946) Hungarian Designer – Applied Arts

    In Budapest, he studied law, while elsewhere, he studied sketching and painting. During World War I, he began drawing and became interested in Kasimir Malevich and El Lissitzky. Read More →

  • Eva Zeisel (1906 – 2011) Hungarian designer and ceramicist

    Eva Zeisel (1906 – 2011) Hungarian designer and ceramicist

    Eva Zeisel (1906 – 2011) was a Hungarian designer and ceramicist. She was born in Budapest. She was professionally active in Germany, Russia, Austria, and the USA. She settled in the United States in 1938.Read More →

You may also be interested in

École Boulle – College of fine arts and crafts, Paris – Encyclopedia of Design

École Boulle is a college for fine arts and crafts and applied arts in Paris, France. The École Boulle was created in 1886 and is named after the cabinetmaker André-Charles Boulle, who during the reign of Louis XIV (1643-1715), the Sun King, was commonly considered to be the preeminent artist in the field of marquetry or inlay.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.