ceramic

A ceramic is any of the various hard, brittle, heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant materials made by shaping and then firing an inorganic, nonmetallic material, such as clay, at a high temperature.
Maiolica tin-glazed earthenware

Maiolica is a tin-glazed earthenware that was produced during the Renaissance in Italy. The name comes from Majorca, the island from which, in the 15th century, a lot of Hispano-Moresque tin-glazed pottery was brought into Italy. The technique of covering with a tin glaze earthenware was similar to that used elsewhere in Europe for delftware and faience.Read More →

Arzberg Porcelain Firm

Arzberg is regarded as one of the most prestigious porcelain design houses in the world. The definition of good design. Arzberg combines aesthetics, functionality, and durability.Read More →

Robert Bonfils Chair

Born in Paris, Robert Bonfils was a French graphic artist, painter, and designer. He studied at the École Germain-Pilon in 1903 and at the École Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1906.

He worked for Henri Hamm, a furniture designer. His work included paintings, bookbindings, ceramics for Sèvres, Bianchini-Frerier silk, wallpaper and interior design layouts. He designed the tea room at the Au Printemps department store in Paris. With depictions of the seasons, he decorated the wall.Read More →

Porsgrund Porselænsfabrik the largest Porcelain factory in Norway

Porsgrunds Porselænsfabrik is a Norwegian porcelain manufacturer. For more than 130 years, it has supplied the Norwegian market with crockery and ornaments in porcelain. From 1930 to 1980, Porsgrund was one of Norway’s leading design companies, and they received both national and international design awards.Read More →

Eva Zeisel ceramics featured image

Eva Zeisel (1906 – 2011) was a Hungarian designer and ceramicist. She was born in Budapest. She was professionally active in Germany, Russia, Austria, and the USA. She settled in the United States in 1938.Read More →

Ceramics by Jonina Guonadottir

Jonina Gudhnadottir (b.1943) is an Icelandic ceramicist. She is based professionally in Reykavik. Her work has been seen in many exhibitions.Read More →

Susie Cooper ceramics featured image

Breakfast in an American middle-class home in the 1940s was often served on dishes designed by English designer Susie Cooper (1902-1995).Read More →

Adelaide Robineau Ceramicist

Adelaide Romineau was an American ceramicist she was born in Middletown, Connecticut. At the time, few women were involved in the technical aspects of ceramic production. It was considered appropriate for women to be decorators only, rather than to be part of more technical pursuits.Read More →

Eric Ravilious

Eric William Ravilious was a British painter, designer, book illustrator and wood-engraver. He is particularly known for his watercolours of the South Downs and other English landscapes. He served as a war artist, and was the first British war artist to die on active service in World War II. Ravilious studied with Edward Bawden and Charles Mahoney at the Royal College of Art (RCA) in London in 1928. He painted a series of marionette-like murals for Morley College, which were destroyed by bombing in 1941.Read More →

Vase manufactured by the Eureka Pottery 1883 to 1887

The Eureka Pottery was the last commercial pottery constructed during the historic three decades during which potteries were established in Trenton. The company made the most beautiful majolica in Trenton. It was established in 1883 by Leon Weil, who Noah and Charles Boch succeeded. It was closed in 1887 due to fire, the constant enemy of potteries.Read More →

Vase Grand Feu Art Pottery

Grand Feu Art Pottery, was founded in California by Cornelius Brauckman. Its output was of high quality and aesthetically distinctive. Generically, grand feu is ceramic ware fired at 2500°F (1400°C), maturing its body and glaze simultaneously. Grand feu is both porcelain and gres, and Grand Feu Art Pottery specialises in the latter.Read More →

Edward Lycett (1833 – 1910) was a British Ceramicist. He was born in Newcastle under Lyme. He was professionally active in New York.Read More →

The Faience Manufacturing Company was an American manufacturing company that operated between 1880 – 1892 in the Greenpoint area of Brooklyn, New York. There is little evidence of the remains of the Company as it failed in 1892.Read More →

The Yorkshire Coast featured image

She was a juror of the 1922 Carnegie International competition, Pittsburgh. She designed both the shapes and the decorations for the 1933—34 Circus range of tableware produced by Arthur J. Wilkinson, Burslem, under Clarice Cliff’s supervision.Read More →

Ceramics - terracotta pots stacked

Ceramics are objects made of moistened clay, shaped and then baked. All ceramics are Earthenware, terracotta, brick, tile, faience, majolica, stoneware, and porcelain. Ceramicware is decorated with clay inlays, relief patterns on the surface, or incised, stamped or embossed designs. Read More →

pottery wheel

A leading development in the world of craft and design that took some time toRead More →

Ruskin Pottery featured image

While it was prone to cynicism in the 20th century – for example, it was often pointed out that Morris’ handmade goods were too costly for anyone other than the wealthy he claimed to despise. However, through a fertile and now highly valued time of applied art, the Arts & Crafts wove a distinctive pattern.Read More →

Alexandre Bigot (1862-1927) was a french ceramics manufacturer. He was initially a physics and chemistry teacher. Read More →

Joseph Mougin decided to become a ceramicist after seeing an exhibition of Jean Carriès’s pottery in 1894. He set up a studio and a kiln in Montrouge with the help of sculptor friend Lemarquier and his brother Pierre Mougin.Read More →

Minton Ceramics Manufacturer

Thomas Minton bought a pottery in Stoke-on-Trent in 1793 and, in 1796, began production of inexpensive blue transfer-printed earthenware. His son Herbert Minton became director in 1836, expanded the range of wares, and hired artists. Read More →