ceramic

Alexandre Bigot (1862-1927) was a french ceramics manufacturer. He was initially a physics and chemistry teacher. Read More →

Joseph Mougin decided to become a ceramicist after seeing an exhibition of Jean Carriès’s pottery in 1894. He set up a studio and a kiln in Montrouge with the help of sculptor friend Lemarquier and his brother Pierre Mougin.Read More →

Vase manufactured by the Eureka Pottery 1883 to 1887

The Eureka Pottery was the last commercial pottery constructed during the historic three decades during which potteries were established in Trenton. The company made the most beautiful majolica in Trenton. It was established in 1883 by Leon Weil, who Noah and Charles Boch succeeded. It was closed in 1887 due to fire, the constant enemy of potteries.Read More →

Minton Ceramics Manufacturer

Thomas Minton bought a pottery in Stoke-on-Trent in 1793 and, in 1796, began production of inexpensive blue transfer-printed earthenware. His son Herbert Minton became director in 1836, expanded the range of wares, and hired artists. Read More →

The Yorkshire Coast featured image

She was a juror of the 1922 Carnegie International competition, Pittsburgh. She designed both the shapes and the decorations for the 1933—34 Circus range of tableware produced by Arthur J. Wilkinson, Burslem, under Clarice Cliff’s supervision.Read More →

Ruskin Pottery featured image

While it was prone to cynicism in the 20th century – for example, it was often pointed out that Morris’ handmade goods were too costly for anyone other than the wealthy he claimed to despise. However, through a fertile and now highly valued time of applied art, the Arts & Crafts wove a distinctive pattern.Read More →

Arzberg Porcelain Firm

Arzberg is regarded as one of the most prestigious porcelain design houses in the world. The definition of good design. Arzberg combines aesthetics, functionality, and durability.Read More →

Lee Yun Hee is a very popular Korean ceramic artist. Her ceramic works consists of layers of variously sized unitsRead More →

New Wave Clay featured image

Throughout the twentieth century, ceramics was broadly divided into two sectors. Studio pottery, which was a reaction against the mass-made wares of the industrial revolution, and fine art by contemporary artists, who just happened to use clay in their practice but rejected many of its traditional codes of practice.Read More →

Shoji Hamada featured image

Shoji Hamada, along with Bernard Leach, was one of the key figures in the development of studio pottery in the 20th century. His influence both in England and the US as well as in his native Japan cannot be underestimated. Read More →

Émile Diffloth featured image

In 1899, he became artistic director of Kéramis, Belgian pottery owned by Boch Freres in La Louviere. In c1910, he moved to University City, Missouri, to work for Taxile Doat as a ceramics teacher at the School of Ceramic Art. He went back to France. He belonged to the Société des Artistes Françaises.Read More →

Stig Lindberg featured image

Stig Lindberg (1916 – 1982) was a Swedish ceramic, glass, textile, industrial designer, and painter and illustrator. During his long career with the Gustavsberg pottery factory, Lindberg produced whimsical studio ceramics and graceful tableware lines, making him one of Sweden’s most important postwar designers. Read More →

Taxile Doat featured image

Taxile Maxmilien Doat (1851 – 1938) was a French ceramicist. He was born in Albi, and he was active in University City, Missouri.Read More →

Anders Liljefors was a Swedish ceramicist. He initially concerned himself with household ware, discovered a new method of casting ceramics in a sand mould, and worked feverishly to extract new and unexpected effects from this material during the later years of his life.Read More →

Dorodango ball

The hand-rolling of this soil-based mixture can be relaxing and comfortable to do. Dorodango is not without its difficulties and needs a high degree of skill, patience and concentration. Given the fragility and inclination of the dorodango to break, the perfectly formed ball is elusive. It can also be a challenging process to achieve the perfect shine.Read More →

Dish (1987) designed by Yūsuke Aida featured image

Yūsuke Aida (1931-2015) – Japanese ceramics designer and industrial designer. He studied town planning at Chiba University and ceramics under Ken Miyanohara. Read More →

Susie Cooper ceramics featured image

Breakfast in an American middle-class home in the 1940s was often served on dishes designed by English designer Susie Cooper (1902-1995).Read More →

Model by Charles John Noke featured image

He modelled vases (including Columbis and Diana) and figures from 1893 to 1898. (including Holbein and Rembrandt vases). With Cuthbert Bailey and John Slater, he experimented with the reproduction of Sung, Ming, and early Ch’ing dynasty blood-red rouge flambé and sang-de-boeuf glazes from the late 1890s to the early 1900sRead More →

Marblehead Pottery featured image

Herbert J. Hall founded the Marblehead Pottery in 1904 as one of several “handcraft shops” that offered occupational therapy to “nervously worn outpatients.” The shops specialised in hand-weaving, woodcarving, and metalwork, with pottery being the most popular.Read More →

Helen Boehm was an American businesswoman who helped market her husband’s porcelain creations to people all over the world. The work of their family can be found in the White House and in the homes of world leaders across the globe. Given the nickname “Princess of Porcelain,” Mrs. Boehm’s quick thinking and marketing strategies have allowed their products to become standard offerings from United States Presidents to foreign dignitaries.Read More →