Yūsuke Aida (1931 – 2015) – Japanese ceramics & industrial designer

Dish (1987) designed by Yūsuke Aida
Dish (1987) designed by Yūsuke Aida

Yūsuke Aida (會田雄介) (1931-2015) was a Japanese ceramics designer and industrial designer. 

Education

He studied town planning at Chiba University and ceramics under Ken Miyanohara. 

Biography

Working in the USA from 1961-64, he was chief designer at Bennington Potters, Vermont, where he executed its 1961 Classic range of industrially produced tableware, still in production today. 

Works

When he returned to Japan, he reverted to studio pottery production. 

He executed large ceramic wall panels for the Tourist Hotel, Nagoya, and the Osaka Ina building in the 1970s.

1972-74, he was director of Japanese Designer Craftsman Association and, from 1976, its successor, Japan Craft Design Association. 

Recognition

Classic tableware included in 1983-84 ‘Design Since 1945’ exhibition, Philadelphia Museum of Art.

His work was shown at the 1982 ‘Contemporary Vessels: How to Pour’ exhibition at Tokyo National Museum of Modem-Art. 

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

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