Arzberg Porcelain Firm
Arzberg Porcelain Firm

Arzberg is regarded as one of the most prestigious porcelain design houses in the world. The definition of good design. Arzberg combines aesthetics, functionality, and durability.

History

Arzberg is the trademark of a German porcelain factory founded in Arzberg, Bavaria, in 1887. Its renown is partly due to designs by Hermann Gretsch, whose Form 1382, created in 1931 and based on Bauhaus principles, is regarded as a watershed moment in modern design; Form 1382 is still manufactured and sold around the world.

2006" Peter Schmidt dining set
Chicago, UNITED STATES: Buyers look over the German Arzberg “2006” Peter Schmidt dining set 12 March 2006 at the 2006 International Home and Housewares Show at McCormick Place in Chicago. AFP PHOTO/Jeff HAYNES (Photo credit should read JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images)

The Arzberg trademark was taken over by SKV-Porzellan-Union GmbH, created in 1993 by the porcelain businesses Schirnding, Kronester, and Johann Seltmann Vohenstrauß, after Hutschenreuther AG, which had held the name since 1972, was dissolved in 2000. Arzberg-Porzellan GmbH was renamed SKV-Porzellan-Union GmbH in 2004. In 2003, the company employed over 250 people. However, since 2000, the firm’s headquarters that owns the Arzberg (and Schirnding) trademarks have been in Schirnding, where production took place. Arzberg GmbH announced its insolvency after ten years. Rosenthal porcelain owns the trademark now.

Arzberg Collection in our partner stores

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

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