Barbini Glassworks
Barbini Glassworks

Barbini Glassworks is an Italian Glass Manufacturer.

Background

Alfredo Barbini, a descendant of glassmakers from the early 15th century, studied at Abate Zanetti (design school at Murano glass museum) from age ten; in 1930, began studying at Cristalleria, Murano, becoming a maestro; became primo maestro at Martinuzzi and Zecchin; worked with Cenedese in the late 1940s; created Masello techniques—the sculpting of a solid piece of molten glass without moulding and blowing; received 1955, Croce de Cavaliere al Merito from the Italian government.

Contemporary Italian glass artist, Alfredo Barbini
Contemporary Italian glass artist, Alfredo Barbini cast his own hand to form this piece with an acid etched finish which is on display at the Jones Museum of Glass. (Photo by Doug Jones/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Exhhibitions

Showed work independently at 1948 and 1950 Biennale di Venezia.

Recognition

Among numerous other honours, Barbini was awarded the “Osella d’Oro” by Venice’s Associazione degli Industriale and the honorary title “Commendatore” and was named “1989 Venetian of the Year” by the Settimare Association.

Barbini Glass Decorations
One of Mr Barbini sons checks one of the several hundreds glass decorations that will be part of a mirror on July 20, 2011 in Venice, Italy. (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

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  • Pavilion de l’Esprit Nouveau  (1925) Looking into the Future

    Pavilion de l’Esprit Nouveau  (1925) Looking into the Future

    L’Esprit Nouveau. The pavillion was named after Le Corbusier’s magazine, L’Esprit Nouveau, which he started in 1920 to spread the word about his own work and that of other artists of the time.Read More →

  • Alessandro Mendini (b.1931) Italy’s famous design thinker

    Alessandro Mendini (b.1931) Italy’s famous design thinker

    Alessandro Mendini (b.1931) played an important part in the development of Italian, Postmodern, and Radical design. He was co-founder of Studio Alchymia (with Alessandro and Adriana Guernero) in 1976. He was awarded several international prizes, including the Compasso d’Oro in 1979, 1981, and 2014. In 2011, he was awarded with the title Doctor Honoris Causa of the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan.Read More →

  • ‘Moderne’ Style of Art Deco Popular in the 20s & 30s

    ‘Moderne’ Style of Art Deco Popular in the 20s & 30s

    Moderne was a decorative style that was mostly about how things looked on the outside. Moderne architecture was most noticeable in public buildings like skyscrapers and movie theatres. Postmodernism later brought back a lot of the styles that were part of the moderne movement.Read More →

  • The HMV Electric Convector Heater by Christian Barman

    The HMV Electric Convector Heater by Christian Barman

    Christian Barman’s 1934 HMV Electric Convector Heater is a classic example of Streamline Modern design. The heater’s stepped parabolic curves are both functional and beautiful. Even though it isn’t streamlined in the strictest sense, it still has the look of modern design.Read More →

  • Hermann Junger (b.1928) Bauhaus influenced jewellery

    Hermann Junger (b.1928) Bauhaus influenced jewellery

    Hermann Junger was one of the best goldsmiths in Germany. His creative jewellery had a big impact not only in Germany, but also all over Europe and the U.S. He studied at the Staatliche Zeichenakademie, Hanau.Read More →

  • Hans Gugelot (1920 – 1965) Dutch-Swiss Product Designer

    Hans Gugelot (1920 – 1965) Dutch-Swiss Product Designer

    Hans Gugelot (1920 – 1965) began his career in engineering (1940–2) and architecture (1940–6) in Switzerland and was closely associated with the radical Hochschüle für Gestaltung (HfG) in UlmRead More →

  • The Olivetti Lettera 22 Typewriter – Lightweight and Compact

    The Olivetti Lettera 22 Typewriter – Lightweight and Compact

    Olivetti’s 1950 Olivetti 22 typewriter became the standard for portable typewriters. Marcello Nizzoli’s Typewriter won the Compasso d’Oro at the 10th Triennale in Rome in 1951. Ettore Sottsass would further develop this design in the 1964 Teckne 3.Read More →

  • Proust Armchair (1978) – Luxury Comes in All Forms

    Proust Armchair (1978) –  Luxury Comes in All Forms

    The Studio Alchimia in Milan was founded in 1976 and exhibited its first collection in 1979. Alessandro Mendini’s Proust armchair is one of the most unusual pieces from the Bau.Haus collection. It was made in a small number and individually painted to express the collective’s unease with mass production.Read More →

  • Alessi Italian Design sophistication in the everyday

    Alessi Italian Design sophistication in the everyday

    Alessi is an Italian domestic metal products factory. You would think that Alessi Italy’s foremost design factory would have its headquarters in an imposing palazzo in Milan. Instead, the company is nestled near a small northern Italian lake called Lago d’Orta, a mountain range from its more famous big brother, Lago Maggiore.Read More →

  • Punk Fanzine: Sniffin’ Glue

    Punk Fanzine: Sniffin’ Glue

    The DIY style was one of the novelties that British punk introduced in the 1970s. There were hundreds of these fanzines, the most well-known of which being Sniff in ‘Glue. i-D, published by the art director Terry Jones, evolved from a fanzine into a publishing success.Read More →

  • Louis Rault (1847 – 1903) French sculptor, engraver and jewellery designer

    Louis Rault (1847 – 1903) French sculptor, engraver and jewellery designer

    Louis Rault (1847 – 1903) was a French Sculptor, engraver, silversmith and jewellery designer.Between 1868 and 1875, Rault worked in the Boucheron workshop on the Place Vendôme in Paris. At the end of the nineteenth century, he set up a workshop where he produced silver and jewellery in the Art Nouveau style.Read More →

  • Gerhard Munthe (1855-1929) Norwegian textile, furniture, Interior Designer

    Gerhard Munthe (1855-1929) Norwegian textile, furniture, Interior Designer

    Between 1877-82, he lived in Munich. As a pictorial artist, he brought about the break with historicism in Norway. Drawing on Norwegian folk art and poetry, he illustrated books and designed tapestries for firms including DNB (Det Norske Billedvaveri).Read More →

  • Design in Scandinavia travelling exhibition, 1954 – 1957

    Design in Scandinavia travelling exhibition, 1954 – 1957

    Brilliant examples of contemporary home furnishings were shown from Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden and exposed Americans to Scandinavian design, inspiring a shift towards mid-century design.Read More →

  • Sculptures by Roy Lichenstein are Simply fun!

    Sculptures by Roy Lichenstein are Simply fun!

    A selection of Roy Lichtenstein artwork contained in the MoMA collection. A key figure in the Pop art movement and beyond, Roy Lichtenstein grounded his profoundly inventive career in imitation—beginning by borrowing images from comic books and advertisements in the early 1960s, and eventually encompassing those of everyday objects, artistic styles, and art history itself.Read More →

  • Frederick Kiesler Austrian American Designer

    Frederick Kiesler Austrian American Designer

    Frederick John Kiesler, an Austrian-American architect, theoretician, theatre designer, artist, and sculptor, was born Friedrich Jacob Kiesler in Czernowitz, Austria-Hungary Empire (now Chernivtsi, Ukraine), in 1890. 1965 saw his passing.Read More →

  • Introducing Kazuhide Takahama (b.1930) Japanese Designer

    Introducing Kazuhide Takahama (b.1930) Japanese Designer

    At the X Milan Triennale exhibition in 1954, he met the furniture manufacturer, Dino Gavina, who subsequently invited Takahama to work for him in Italy. Takahama’s first design for Gavina was the geometrically severe Naeko sofa-bed (1957). Read More →

  • Tammis Keefe (1913 – 1960) American Textile Designer

    Tammis Keefe (1913 – 1960) American Textile Designer

    Tammis Keefe (1913–1960) was an American textile designer. She designed everything from dish towels to glassware in her airy Dorothy Leibis Studio. Her work can be found at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Cooper Hewitt and the Fashion Institute of Technology.Read More →

  • Halogen bulbs revolutionised home lighting.

    Halogen bulbs revolutionised home lighting.

    The halogen bulb is the first new invention to completely transform the lighting industry since Thomas Alva Edison succeeded in creating the incandescent lamp by successfully making a loop of carbonized cotton thread glow in a vacuum for 40 hours.Read More →

  • Marco Zotta (b.1945) Italian industrial designer

    Marco Zotta (b.1945) Italian industrial designer

    He designed furniture and furnishings, lighting for clients including Fargas, Le Cose, Studio Grando, Stilnovo and Evoluzione. He became a member of ADI (Associazione per il Disegno Industriale).Read More →

  • Christian Dell (1893 – 1974) German metalworker designer

    Christian Dell (1893 – 1974) German metalworker designer

    Christian Dell (1893–1974) was a German silversmith. Dell was born in Hesse’s Offenbach am Main. In the 1920s, Dell ran the metal workshop at the Bauhaus University, and his designs are, in line with the Bauhaus style, characterised by modern shapes and functionality. After his successful stint as an industrial designer, Dell returned in the late 1940s to his original profession as a silversmith.Read More →

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