12 Russian Propaganda Posters

This display of street posters reflects the ideals and delusions of the Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union.

The Bolsheviks grabbed control of the printing presses in order to gain support for their ideology. Despite a lack of resources and equipment, they produced newspapers, leaflets, and posters in a timely manner. The profusion of colourful propaganda posters altered towns and cities, resulting in a sort of street art that was accessible to everyone. The images’ constant renewal, as well as multiple copies pasted together, underscored the fundamental messages of collective power and solidarity. While their opponents in the Civil War were vilified, Lenin and the Bolshevik leaders were regarded as courageously unifying.

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Following Stalin’s ascension to power in 1927, the propaganda machine pushed for land collectivisation and an industrialisation drive, despite the fact that these policies resulted in horrific difficulties. The pleasant image of Stalin was all over, but it couldn’t hide the fear of the show trials and killings that plagued the 1930s. The revolutionary ardour depicted in the early posters was now used to instal a brutal regime.

These posters offered ideals and illusions that were distant from reality. The posters, on the other hand, became part of the fabric of Soviet society, reflecting the officially sanctioned history as it was experienced by its population.

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